Pterodactyl — Extinct or Alive?

“Pterosaur” is the correct name for what is called “pterodactyl,” but we will here use the common, albeit inaccurate, word. The controversay of recent years involves assumptions about extinctions (yes, the plural of “extinction,” for these magnificent feather-less flying creatures are of many species, not one). This extinction assumption itself deserves thoughtful scrutiny.

Extinction of all pterodactyls has been assumed for generations, at least in Western societies, so why doubt that these flying creatures are all extinct? Look at the history of fossil discoveries and find the answer: Early searchers and researchers assumed that the strange fossils were of animals that no longer live. Why? Those particular discoverers (few they were in numbers) had no knowledge of living creatures that were like those pterodactyl fossils.

But why believe that pterodactyls still live? It is the eyewitnesses, common persons from many countries and many cultures. Those eyewitnesses have reported large flying creatures, featherless but different from bats. Most reports are of long-tailed creatures, obviously not bats.

Let’s look at one of those eyewitnesses, Eskin Kuhn, who was a United States Marine in 1971, when he was stationed at the Guantanamo military base in Cuba. Let’s consider some of his own words.

 I was looking in the direction of the ocean when I saw an incredible sight . . .  I saw 2 Pterosaurs (or Pterodactyls…what’s in a name?) flying together at low altitude, perhaps 100 feet, very close in range . . . I had a perfectly clear view of them.

Pterodactyls have been reported alive for many generations, although they used to be called “flying dragons.” Trusting human experience more than human imagination, we must admit the possibility that at least one or two species of pterodactyls may still be living.

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