Dinosaurs and Pterosaurs in Acambaro

Where is the physical evidence for modern ropens, or extant long-tailed pterosaurs? It’s there to see, for those who are open-minded enough to look. But let’s now examine the bigger picture: non-extinct dinosaurs, at least in some species and at least at some time in human history. Let’s look at Acambaro, Mexico.

The Julsrud Figurine Collection

In 1945, the German merchant Waldemar Julsrud (an immigrant) discovered a clay figurine at the foot of El Toro mountain, near Acambaro, Mexico. He already owned an extensive collection of ancient art and recognized the importance of the new discovery. He agreed to pay a local man, Odilon Tinajero, one peso for each similar figurine that could be recovered without too much damage. Jurlsrud gave no guarantee of any payment for broken pieces, especially not for pieces that appeared impossible or impractical to try to put together.

Julsrud eventually collected about 32,000 figurines (Mystery in Acambaro, by Hapgood). That number is significantly absent in skeptical articles that declare the works of art to be recent fakes. Who in the world would participate in such an extraordinary endeavor when the whole thing was a hoax? Probably nobody. So this huge collection of figurines is in fact genuine, at least with most pieces, but we have much more evidence that just this number: 32,000.

One of the leading experts in recent years, Dr. Dennis Swift, has said that the collection at one time numbered 33,500, at the time that the collection was at its largest. Only a small portion of them represent dinosaurs.

The people who created and collected the figurines are of the Chupicuaro culture, which existed many centuries ago. It’s important to note that there are many styles of art represented in these figurines, and the Chupicuaro people may have collected art from diverse sources and supported artists who had a variety of skills and styles.

Julsrud owned tens of thousands of ancient figurines, for many years. During all that time, he never sold one of the pieces of art, with one exception: One figurine was sold to someone for scientific examination and testing. This is an important point when we examine the possibility of hoaxes: Why would anybody pay one peso each for tens of thousands of ceramic figurines, when almost none of them were ever sold? Indeed, Julsrud made it a rule to refuse to sell any of those works of art.

Don Patton has been an active field investigator for years, including work in Colorado, Texas, Wyoming, and Canada (dinosaur excavations) and in Cambodia (he examined an apparent Stegosaurus image on an ancient temple wall). He was introduced to the Acambaro figurines collection by Charles Hapgood, who investigating the many thousands of art pieces with the help of Erle Stanley Gardner. Both Hapgood and Gardner became convinced that the figurines were genuine ancient works of art.

Although very few pieces may appear to be obvious ropens, we can see some evidence for living pterosaurs in this vast collection.

ancient dinosaur art, Acambaro, Mexico

Ancient figurines that seem to represent dinosaurs (Acambaro, Mexico)

Answers to Skeptics

The following relate to criticisms by skeptics. Charles C. Di Peso concluded that the figurines were fakes (a), so we’ll start with the opinions of Di Peso, an American archaeologist. A major credibility problem with this man comes from the time he spent in the home of Waldemar Julsrud: Di Peso studied the vast collection not in months or in weeks or in days but only in four hours.

  1. Di Peso had samples of one or more of the figurines tested and found no evidence of any recent origin (b). This detail is absent in the Acambaro page of Wikipedia (a).
  2. Di Peso said that the surfaces of the figurines “displayed no signs of age [probably referring to patina]; no dirt was packed into their crevices” (a). But Dr. J. Antonio Villia Hennejon said that the figurines “were encrusted with dirt and other materials [patina].” In addition, “during Easter week of 1951 [Dr. Hennejon] spent two days with Julsrud cleaning the dirt and patina off recently excavated ceramic pieces” (b).
  3. Di Peso said that “though some figurines were broken, no pieces were missing” (a), but “Tinajero [the man doing much of the excavations] was very careful with the excavation process so as not to break the pieces, and the broken ones were cemented together before being brought to Julsrud” (b). In addition, it would have taken at least several days to carefully unpack all the boxes and more days to give them even a cursory examination. Yet Di Peso was in the Jurlsrud home for only four hours. In reality there were many broken pieces (b).
  4. One skeptic said that the collection was so vast that the many thousands of figurines would have to be hoaxes. Perhaps this non-scientist was thinking that great discoveries in archaeology cannot be made without quick acceptance from many scientists or that it’s impossible for anyone to find any vast number of ancient artifacts even if many years are spent in the endeavor, no matter where the discovery is made. That non-expert apparently was ignorant of the absence of any ceramic home (or in other) industry in this part of Mexico, in modern history (only anciently). He was probably also ignorant of a number of investigations in Mexico, official government investigations included. Those found that there was no manufacturing of ceramics anywhere in that area in recent history (b).

(a) Wikipedia page “Acambaro Figures”

(b) “The Dinosaur Figurines Of Acambaro, Mexico” (Bible.ca/tracks . . .)

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Apparent Ropens in the USA

I had no idea that many Americans had encountered, in the forty-eight contiguous states of the USA, flying creatures like the ropen.

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Dinosaurs in Acambaro, Mexico

Many people assume dinosaurs never lived at the same time as humans. Not so, for some ancient human cultures were in contact with dinosaurs, shown in their art.

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Dinosaur Figurines of Acambaro

The same modern ideas [about the appearances of dinosaurs] are reflected in clay figurines from the Pre-classical Chupicuaro Culture (800 B.C. to 200 A.D.) found near Acambaro, Guanajuato, Mexico.

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Images of Clay Dinosaurs of Acambaro, Mexico

Fascinating ancient art depicting living dinosaurs

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Coexistence of Humans and Dinosaurs at Acambaro

Now, Professor Hapgood is an interesting individual. He is essentially fair-minded, well-balanced, and not given to hasty decisions . . .

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Ten Years Ago on Umboi Island

According to Blume, in a wide area of Papua New Guinea, many nationals give similar descriptions: bat-like wings, long body, tail with a flange, pelican-like bill, and a “comb” (more rounded than horn-like) on the back of the head.

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Carbon Dating Dinosaur Bones and Acambaro

. . . many thousands of artistic representations of apparent dinosaurs are found on the Acambaro figurines of Mexico. Detailed analysis, in recent years, demonstrates that the anatomy and stances of some of these dinosaurs fit more neatly within recent scientific ideas about those dinosaurs that appear to be represented.

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Dinosaurs Living With Humans

. . . why does [Wikipedia] say there “are several thousand” of those figurines [in Acambaro, Mexico] when one of the leading experts in the world, Dr. Dennis Swift, says over 37,000 were discovered?

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2 thoughts on “Dinosaurs and Pterosaurs in Acambaro

  1. Pingback: Live Ropens and Dinosaurs With Humans | Pterosaur Eyewitness Group Support - PEGS

  2. Pingback: Reply to Misidentification Conjectures | Modern Pterosaur

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